Author Topic: Synchronize Video FPS causes recording FPS to drop  (Read 964 times)

Rotareneg

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Synchronize Video FPS causes recording FPS to drop
« on: October 17, 2016, 10:57:13 am »
When "Synchronize Video FPS" is enabled the recording frame rate will drop significantly. In the linked video below, the first part was recorded with "Synchronize Video FPS" off and the video properly recorded at 60 FPS. With "Synchronize Video FPS" enabled the game frame rate was locked at 60 FPS as expected, but the recording itself dropped to 30 FPS and also stutters badly.

https://youtu.be/esi1_bWpUcU

This happened with every Direct3D game I tried. Minecraft, which uses OpenGL, worked correctly with "Synchronize Video FPS" enabled. This is a new issue and was not present in Dxtory 2.0.136.

« Last Edit: October 18, 2016, 02:14:01 am by Rotareneg »

ExKoder

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Re: [BUG] Synchronize Video FPS causes recording FPS to drop
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2016, 12:03:14 am »
use "Wait for Available Buffer".

Ver2.0.137 later, Implementation of DX9 is different.
Internally, in the case of a single GPU, it will be processed in the DX11 device.
DX10 DX11 DX12 is also, but if it does not actively waiting to be processed, there is a tendency to memory transfer is postponed.
This depends on the environment. (OS, Video driver etc)

De-M-oN

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Re: [BUG] Synchronize Video FPS causes recording FPS to drop
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2016, 12:28:10 am »
For what the sync anyway?

Rotareneg

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Re: [BUG] Synchronize Video FPS causes recording FPS to drop
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2016, 02:13:46 am »
That fixed it, thanks ExKoder. :)

De-M-oN, Synchronize Video FPS ensures that every rendered frame gets captured (well, as long as the encoder can keep up.) If a game is running at 60 FPS but you're capturing at 30 FPS it'll miss every other frame. On some games that doesn't matter, but sometimes certain effects may have a fixed duration. For example, the first frame of muzzle blast from a gun might be 1 frame long. Recording at 30 FPS, you'll have a 50/50 chance of missing that frame entirely unless the game itself is also rendering at 30 FPS. Recording at 60 FPS would be the nicer alternative, but isn't always an option, and for some games the lower frame rate isn't a big deal and makes the whole video capture/render/upload process faster. Oh, and I'm not talking about first person shooters, I wouldn't want to play most of those at 30 FPS. :D